COVID alert levels, tier 2 and tier 3: What do they mean for the housing market?

Posted on Saturday, November 28, 2020

COVID alert levels, tier 2 and tier 3: What do they mean for the housing market?

From 2 December, the UK Government reverts to its localised approach to managing the Coronavirus outbreak in England. It is important to understand the COVID alert level system and what the different levels mean, what new restrictions they impose and how they will impact businesses and the housing market.

What are the COVID alert levels?

Important note: The guidance, restrictions and legislation surrounding the Coronavirus pandemic are constantly changing and therefore you must always refer to the Government guidance to stay abreast of the latest information.

The COVID alert levels are designed to set out information in a simple, structured way, so that local authorities, residents, and workers can easily interpret what restrictions are in place in their local area.

Each local authority is given an alert level, often referred to as ‘tiers’, tier 1 being the lowest and tier 3 being the highest. This is a brief outline of the tiers. For the full information on COVID alert levels, visit the Government website.

 

Tier 1 (Medium)

Rule of 6 applies to all socialising indoors or outdoors

Business and venues can continue to operate

Certain businesses are required to ensure customers only consume food and drink while seated and must close between 11pm and 5am.

Attendance to outdoor and indoor events is permitted with a cap on numbers

Schools and Universities remain open

If you travel to a tier 2 you must follow the local rules there

You should avoid traveling to tier 3 areas unless it's for work, education or youth services

Tier 2 (High)

No socialising with anyone outside of your household or support bubble in any indoor setting

Rule of 6 applies if socialising outside

Businesses and venues can continue to operate

Pubs and bars must close unless operating as restaurants.

Attendance to outdoor and indoor events is permitted but with a cap on numbers

Schools and Universities remain open.

You can still travel to venues or amenities that are open, but should look to reduce the number of journeys

If you live in a tier 2 area and travel to tier 1, you must still follow tier 2 rules.

You should avoid traveling to tier 3 areas unless it's for work, education or youth services

Tier 3 (Very High)

No socialising with anyone outside of your household or support bubble in any indoor setting and most outdoor settings

Rule of 6 applies if socialising outside

Pubs, bars, hospitality, indoor entertainment and attractions must close

Accommodation such as hotels must close unless those who use the venues use it as a main residence or it is necessary for work, education or training

Avoid traveling outside.

Avoid traveling overnight in another part of the UK if you are a resident in a tier 3 alert level

 

What happens with the housing market in tier 1, tier 2 and tier 3 alert levels?

The current guidance is that house moves and the activity supporting house moves can continue in all the COVID alert level tiers.